bnn18
홍철기 - without cartridge, with cartridge

1. (4:46)
2. (5:54) [sample]

3. (8:54)


running time: 19:38

1. (9:59)
2. (9:33) [sample]


running time: 19:35


released date

format

order

price

2007.8.10

double mini cdr

shop/mail order

10,000원

홍철기 : 턴테이블

녹음 : 홍철기
커버디자인 : 최준용, 홍철기

without cartridge, with cartridge는 Manual에서 나온 5 modules_II "surface & feedback"에 이은 홍철기의 두 번째 턴테이블 솔로 음반으로, 두 개의 미니 cdr이 양면에 부착되어 있는 형식을 발매되었다. 각 시디는 홍철기의 서로 다른 턴테이블 연주방식으로 녹음되었다. without cartridge에서는 앨범제목처럼 바늘을 포함한 카트리지가 없이 어쿠스틱으로 턴테이블을 연주한 트랙들이, 그리고 with cartridge는 카트리지를 단 턴테이블로 전기적으로 연주한 트랙들이 담겨있다.

reviews

[review on Touching Extremes by Massimo Ricci]
Why wasting nerves and energy arguing and fighting when you want to divorce? All’s needed is putting these two 3-inch CDs in the machine and press “play”. You’ll be left alone in seconds. Seriously, this is dangerous noise. Hong Chulki is a turntable artist, not in the vein of Philip Jeck, Janek Schaefer, Christian Marclay or Otomo. No, the only term of comparison here might (vaguely) be Ferran Fages, even if the Catalan improviser approaches his instrument a little less violently (at least as far as the final result is concerned). As the self-explanatory title reveals, Chulki divided his experimentations in separate units, one per mini-CD. “With” has to do with scratching sounds on vinyl, yet it seems that they were produced by a delirious dentist with a nuclear drill. “Without” is slightly more monotonous (ha!) but equally piercing, if not downright membrane-disintegrating. The Korean sonic terrorist amplifies everything he manages to capture until loudness becomes Bible. And you will be careful in avoiding headphones this time, because this stuff literally stings and bites. And is valuable, believe it or not (your ear specialist will confirm, after handing the bill).

[review on Startling Moniker by DaveX]
Fantastic turntable work from the Balloon & Needle label boss Hong Chulki, who has lately joined my personal pantheon of favorite turntable improvisors. One of these days; he can join Otomo Yoshihide, Christian Marclay, and Martin Tetreault for a box set and I can die happy.

Until that day, there’s “Without Cartridge, With Cartridge,” which surely goes about as far as one can with a turntable. Packaged uniquely on either side of a cardboard disc, this double 3″ CDR keeps the “haves” and “have-nots” separated– very nice for those of us who like to contrast the two.

Starting “Without Cartridge,” Hong still manages to generate a surprising variety of sound. As Hong’s full approach for both discs is to play without records, I’m assuming these are all produced from dragging the tonearm remains across the turntable itself in some fashion… though in the end, I’m unable to fully understand how many of these sounds arise. Regardless, it is a much more full sound than I would have guessed– in some ways, even more interesting than the “With Cartridge” half!

Track two goes a long way toward explaining why– these electronic shrieking noises are incredible! Filled out with ringing tones, like bowed glass at high volume, this is a torturous ride. The third track is equally absurd; at some point, listeners just have to sit back and let Hong skullfuck both earholes.

For the “With Cartridge” disc, a more usual gamut of possible sounds are explored– needle drops, slipmat scrapes, fingers against the needle, even electrical problems become “opportunities!” There’s also a good range of more unexpected noises– the intense blasts of screeching metal-on-metal sounds near the end of the second track, for instance. At times, I wonder if Hong is employing anything but the tonearm itself, as the circular looping nature of the turntable seems to vanish. Perhaps Hong has liberated it for play on other surfaces?

“Without Cartridge, With Cartridge” is a surprisingly vital set, not only due to Hong’s instrumental prowess, but for the quality of the improvisation itself. What could have been a cold documentation of the technical limits of the turntable-as-sound-source is instead a well-structured work in its own right, and worthy of more than listeners’ simple curiosity.